With the release of the Oracle Application Testing  Suite (OATS) v 12.5.0.2, Oracle has also released an updated version of the Oracle Flow Builder v12.5.0.2, a tool that’s intended to make functional testing with OATS for Oracle’s E-Business a little easier, by creating scripts constructed from the keyword-driven component-based approach for testing. It’s a methodology that needs no programming expertise.

This article gives a brief overview of the Oracle Flow Builder, and the relationship to OATS. In later articles we’ll dive a little deeper.

But, first let’s remind ourselves of a component of OATS: OpenScript.

OpenScript

OpenScript is a tool that’s part of OATS. It’s used for recording/creating test scripts for both load testing and functional testing of web applications. It’s based on the eclipse IDE, and all scripts created are written in Java. One of the great features of OpenScript is that it has specialised ‘accelerators’ for Oracle technology, taking the burden out of writing complicated test scripts. Out of the box it has accelerators for Web Applications, Hyperion, JD Edwards, Siebel, and of course, the E-Business Suite, which we’ll be discussing in this article.

Fig 1 A screenshot OpenScript, in tree view showing the steps performed for the functional test

Fig 1 A screenshot OpenScript, in tree view showing the steps performed for the functional test

Fig 1 shows OpenScript in tree view, which simply lists all the necessary steps in a user journey. If you’re familiar with Java, you can flip this into Java view, which shows you the actual code that the script will run when played back. One great benefit of having the scripts in Java, is that if the tool doesn’t directly support a feature of your Rich Internet Application (RIA), you can use external third party Java libraries. (For a more detailed overview of OpenScript, see my blog ‘An Introduction to OpenScript’ [THERE WILL BE A LINK HERE AS THIS IS THE 2ND BLOG.)

Oracle Flow Builder

When testing the functionality of E-Business Suite, recording a lot of scripts, each with their own set of data (for example, logins, test data etc) can be time-consuming. Making sure the’re stable can also be a time-consuming chore. Then there’s the time needed to construct test plan/run documentation, which can be considerable. This is where the Oracle Flow Builder can really help. Out of the box it ships with over 2000 pre-built components and 200 pre-built flows (which I will explain in a short while) which allows the construction of test scripts (and relevant documentation) without writing a single line of code. You don’t even need access to the application, as Flow Builder will construct test scripts from the repository.

Fig 2 The login screen for Oracle Flow Builder

Fig 2 The login screen for Oracle Flow Builder

Fig 2 shows the initial login screen, and the first impression is that the screen looks at little ‘busy’, but like any tool not met before, once you get used to it, concepts and functionality become very clear very quickly.

The core concepts of the Oracle Flow Builder are Components, and Flows. Let’s discuss each separately.

Components

Components can be described as atomic actions that a user would perform, such as logging in or creating an invoice batch.

Fig 3 shows an example of the component tree. Components are created in a hierarchy which can be seen. The hierarchy runs like the following:

Release -> Product Family -> Product ->Feature -> Component Name

So from the above (which is out of the box Oracle Flow Builder) we have

Generic -> Automation Tools ->OATS -> EBS Forms -> Change_Org_In_Forms
Fig 3 The component tree

Fig 3 The component tree

 

You’ll also notice the search component which can help users find a component quickly. Fig 4 shows a wild card search within the 12.2.4 release of the E-Business Suite.

Fig 4 Searching for a component

Fig 4 Searching for a component

 

If we select one of these components, we can then view the individual steps (which are defined by keywords) for that particular component. Fig 5 shows an example.

 

Fig 5 The ‘code’ for a component, as defined by keywords

Fig 5 The ‘code’ for a component, as defined by keywords

This is how we build a component. For example, to request the Problem Type select in the List, we simply choose the keyword SELECT, select the type of object, for example LISTBOX, supply it’s Display Name and so on. Once you’ve defined your components (or just updated a pre-supplied one) we can move on to the next step which is adding it to a flow.

In a later Blog, I’ll discuss the creation of a component in detail.

Flows

So we have a collection of components that we’d like to join together to perform a specific user journey. We join the components together into a logical order by defining a flow. Fig 6 shows the flow tree interface. Notice again, just as with components, we can search for a named flow, or simply perform a wildcard search. Again I’ll be discussing flow creation in detail in a future article.

Fig 6 The flow builder tree

Fig 6 The flow builder tree

End Result

The end result of constructing components, creating flows and providing test data for the flow, is a downloadable set of scripts that have been produced by the flow builder, together with test documentation. Fig 7 shows how to access the built in flows so the user can investigate at their leisure. Simply right click on the flow, and you will have the option to generate Oracle Functional Test (OFT) scripts, or generate and download testplan.

Fig 7 Generating code and testplan

Fig 7 Generating code and testplan

I hope this has given you a taste for this very powerful tool provided by Oracle, and the time savings a user will benefit from.

This Oracle Flow Builder and OpenScript for E-Business Suite Functional Testing Blog is part of a series. In the next few Blogs, I’ll explain  in detail components, flows, keyword-driven test design and test documentation, together with the administration side of the Oracle Flow Builder.